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In praise of the Casio World Time watch

My watch for my India trip is the humble Casio World Time Illuminator in black resin. It has 5 alarms, every time zone, and a sub-dial for the home time zone. When working weird shifts across multiple time zones, it's hard to beat.

The World Time has a distinctly 80s aesthetic. While not as gorgeously uncomplicated as the F-91W (my favorite Casio watch), it is still a lovely example of a classic design era. There's a little world display that shows you which time zone you've selected, plus it gives the city code for the biggest city in the time zone.

One of the World Time's biggest selling points is its price. I bought mine from Amazon for $15, only about $6 more than the F-91W. It's almost impossible to beat, and is reliable to boot. Casio claims it has a 10-year battery (depending on usage of the illumination function).

Speaking of illumination, the light on the World Time is much better than that on the F-91W. It has two lights, one in each of the lower corners, and each time you press the light it stays on for 3 seconds.

I'm enjoying my month with the World Time, but even so...I can't wait to get back to my beloved Seiko SKX007K. The World Time has definitely earned its place on my wrist, and I'd recommend it to any world traveler who doesn't want to risk damaging a more expensive piece, but after a month I can hardly wait for some classic diver style.

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