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The film is in the mail

Since I don't yet develop my own film, I need to mail it off to the lab. I've started using The Darkroom in San Francisco for my developing/scanning needs. Today I mailed off five rolls:

  1. Kodax Max 400: An expired roll shot in my Holga 135. The film advance jammed on the 14th frame, so after a year of thinking about trying to fix it and finish the roll, I just rewound it and shipped the roll off half-finished. Since it's expired I pushed it 2 stops but it's a mystery how it'll turn out...
  2. Kodak Portra 400: Shot this in my Canon Rebel 2000. I expect some portraits out of it, but can't quite remember what else. The Canon is a very reliable machine and produces good exposures.
  3. Kodax Tri-X 400: I think I shot this one in my Lomo LC-A, and it would be the first roll out of that camera. I really loved my previous rolls of Tri-X, so I'm pretty excited to see what comes of it. Largely inspired by Doctor Popular's American Analog series (still my favorite ever photo zine).
  4. Fujicolor Superia Xtra 200: A test roll in the Canon Canonet QL17 GIII that I replaced the light seals on last week. Chosen largely for the low cost and low frame count, so if I did a bad job on the seals I won't lose too much. Mostly personal documentary around my home over the weekend.
  5. Kodak Portra 400 in 6x6 120: My first ever roll of 120 film, shot in a Holga 120 I bought from Brendon Holt. I don't know if there will be light leaks or what, but I shot some portraits and random landscapes with it over Christmas with my family. I am excited to see what comes of it! 6x6 means I only get 12 frames per roll, but I do love square format.
Stay tuned for the results! I might try shooting some 35mm color film in the Holga 120 soon, since I really love the look of the exposed sprocket holes, and the Bronica ETRS I picked up a week and a half ago is a MUCH more reliable medium format camera than the Holga.

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